Chile, an elongate strand of a country stretching 2,670 miles along South America's Pacific coast, is blessed with a great variety of climates and soil types.  Winemaking is concentrated in the center of the country, between the coast ranges and the towering Andes Mountains to the east.  With its vast array of microclimates and soils, Chile is rapidly becoming known for an astonishing array of classic grape varieties, including Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Cabernet and Merlot, Syrah, Viognier and others. Perhaps Chile's greatest claim to viticultural fame is the rediscovery of the Bordeaux grape variety Carmenere, which was driven to extinction in Europe by the Phylloxera epidemic of the 19th century.

Chile: Our Producers

Chile is divided north-south into discrete regions generally named for river valleys, and east-west into 3 zones defined as the Costa, Entre Cordilleras, and Andes zones.  More information on Chile's climate, viticultural zones and wines can be found here.